Employment Law

Employment Law Bulletin - October 2021

Welcome The Part-time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 do exactly what it says on the tin. They prevent an employer treating a part-time worker less favourably than their full-time colleagues on the grounds of...

Employment Law Bulletin - September 2021

Welcome The European Court of Justice cast its judgment in two German cases where Muslim employees were banned from wearing headscarves in the workplace. Although the judgment isn’t binding in the UK, courts and tribunals may take the...

Employment Law Bulletin - July 2021

Welcome Indirect discrimination occurs when an employer applies a provision, criterion or practice (PCP) to all employees which disadvantages a group of people who share a protected characteristic (such as race or sex). Indirect discrimination can be...

Employment Bulletin - June 2021

Welcome An employee is constructively dismissed if an employer fundamentally breaches their employment contract, entitling the employee to resign in response and say they were dismissed. The employee must not ‘affirm’ the contract,...

Employment Law Bulletin - May 2021

Welcome The Uber v Aslam domino rally has begun. In Addison Lee v Lange, the Court of Appeal has refused the employer permission to appeal the EAT’s decision that Addison Lee drivers are workers. Addison Lee provided private hire and courier...

Employment Law Bulletin - April 2021

Welcome The Supreme Court has given the final word on whether workers should get paid the national minimum wage for sleeping. The case law in this area has been conflicting, with different courts giving different judgments based on similar...

Employment Law Bulletin - March 2021

Welcome The long running Uber v Aslam saga has finally come to an end. The Supreme Court has confirmed that Uber drivers are workers rather than self-employed contractors. As such, drivers are entitled to basic employment rights such as the national minimum...

Employment Bulletin - February 2021

Interim relief is a powerful employee remedy. Section 128 of the Employment Rights Act 1996 sets out the limited circumstances in which it can be sought: for dismissals relating to trade union or health and safety representative activities, and...

Employment law protection - are properly you covered?

“These are highly uncertain times for businesses, with a heightened vulnerability to Covid-19 related employee claims.  So do you have the level of protection you need?” Is your business covered for employee disputes arising from...

Employment Bulletin - January 2021

Welcome One consequence of the ending of the UK’s transition period following its exit from the EU is that the Government is now free to make changes to employment law that would not have been possible before. There are some limits,...

Employment Bulletin - January 2021

Welcome One consequence of the ending of the UK’s transition period following its exit from the EU is that the Government is now free to make changes to employment law that would not have been possible before. There are some limits,...

Employment Law Bulletin - October 2020

Welcome Whether you call it a second wave or one continuous storm, Covid-19 is at the forefront of every employer’s mind as we enter Autumn. Once again, the government has said employees should work from home if they can, in stark relief...

Employment Law Bulletin - September 2020

Welcome September and October this year see the scaling back of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme under which millions of employees have been placed on furlough while the Government issued grants to employers to cover the cost of their wages....

Employment Bulletin - July 2020

Welcome From this month the new Flexible Furlough Scheme is in operation. Under the old scheme an employee had to be furloughed for at least 21 days and could perform no work in that time. The new scheme allows for a furlough of any period and...

Dismissing employees with less than two years' service: what are the risks?

It appears to be relatively well understood that an employee requires at least two years’ continuous service before they can complain to an Employment Tribunal that they have been unfairly dismissed. However, there seems to be a common misconception...

Flexible Furlough Scheme - Top 10 FAQs

As the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) continues to evolve, this blog deals with the latest incarnation of the scheme; namely the concept of flexible furlough, and represents the position as of 12 June 2020. When the concept was initially...

Employment Law Bulletin - Returning to Work - Article 7: Equality Issues

Equality Issues The risks of Covid-19 do not fall equally. Different age groups and those with various underlying conditions are more at risk from the disease. There is also some evidence that different ethnic groups may also be impacted differently. A...

Employment Law Bulletin - Returning to Work - Article 6: Health and Safety Claims

Health and safety claims Employees have a right to protect themselves in circumstances of danger that they reasonably consider to be serious and imminent. Dismissing an employee in these circumstances will be automatically unfair. There is no qualifying...

Employment Law Bulletin - Returning to Work - Article 5: Employees Who Refuse to Return to Work

Employees who refuse to return to work One concern that many employers have is how to deal with employees who refuse to return to work when requested. Can this be treated as misconduct? Employers should tread carefully. The first thing to be sure of is...

Employment Law Bulletin - Returning to work - Article 4: Test and Trace

Test and Trace The government is in the process of rolling out a new scheme designed to identify those who have been in contact with an infected person and having them self-isolate for 14 days. This means that healthy employees may be instructed to stay...
  • Page 1 of 5